Social Work Advocates Magazine

Help Students Thrive, Heal During a Public Health Crisis

Black teacher with a face mask explaining exam results to elementary student in the classroom.

By Paul R. Pace Social workers can learn how to incorporate safety and connection when working with children and youth who may be experiencing difficulties brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Kashera Guy Robinson, LCSW, and Uraina L. Scott, LCSW, school social workers in the Atlanta area, present the NASW Special Practice Sections webinar, How social workers can help students learn ... Read More »

Author Aims to Dispel Myths About Dissociative Identity Disorder

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Dissociative identity disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder, is a misunderstood and often underdiagnosed condition. A new NASW Press book, Diagnosing and Treating Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Guide for Social Workers and All Frontline Staff, can help both new social workers and experienced frontline staff who may be new to DID. The author, Gregory L. Nooney, has worked in ... Read More »

NASW member comments on staying sober trend

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Retail alcohol sales spiked 20 percent during the first six months of the pandemic. A study shows Americans drank 14 percent more often in response to pandemic-related stress, according to an article posted at thelily.com. However, more people are considering staying sober for a period. A New Year tradition called “Dry January” has helped to grow this trend. “A month ... Read More »

Social Work Pioneers Honored for Blazing Trails

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By Paul R. Pace Five Black women who are NASW Social Work Pioneers® have been honored for their dedication to the profession, improving their communities, and leading the way as trailblazers. Their achievements continue to inspire social workers today. Bernice C. Harper   NASW CEO Angelo McClain and President Mildred “Mit” Joyner congratulated Harper on her 100th birthday in February ... Read More »

The Great Resignation and Social Work – The Latest Issue of Social Work Advocates Is Available Online

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The Great Resignation and Social Work Laetitia Clayton, Editor The COVID-19 pandemic spurred employees in many professions to leave their jobs in record numbers, resulting in what’s being called The Great Resignation. Social workers are leaving jobs, too, but it seems most are staying within the profession. And the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that social work will continue to ... Read More »

Do you fear dying?

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While most people don’t like the idea of death, they are able to accept to some degree that they are going to die one day. For some, however, the fear of death leads to a host of worries about anything that could potentially end their lives, says NASW member Brittney Chesworth, PhD. She is the author of the Psychology Today article, ... Read More »

Immigration Social Work: Big Ideas From Texas

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By Peter Craig If there was ever a perfect place to study immigration social work—especially in light of the ongoing influx of migrants into the U.S.—it would have to be Texas. So how are different social work schools there addressing this increasingly important subject area? Special coursework on immigration would seem a natural, but the subject is already baked into ... Read More »

One Size Does Not Fit All: Advocating for Young Clients With Developmental Disabilities

Social Work Advocates Magazine

By Dinah Wisenberg Brin The obstacles and stresses that children with developmental disabilities and their families face can become overwhelming. The need to navigate a complex services landscape, get help from school officials, deal with social isolation and manage financial strains, among other challenges, often create daunting pressure for parents seeking the right support for children who learn or think ... Read More »