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Let’s Improve Child Welfare Outcomes: The Workforce Matters Briefing

On June 28, 2016, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) co-sponsored a briefing on the child welfare workforce. This briefing entitled, Let’s Improve Child Welfare Outcomes: The Workforce Matters is part of on-going efforts to educate key policymakers in Washington and on Capitol Hill about the importance of a well-trained, educated and staffed workforce within child welfare. Visit this link for a blog post on this briefing. The videos of this event and a list of relevant resources are now available below.

The panelists included Jenny Wood, Chief Deputy, Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Helen Cahalane, University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, Barry Chaffkin, Fostering Change for Children and Brandi Stocksdale, Baltimore City Department of Social Services. The opening remarks were given by Christine James-Brown, President and CEO of the Child Welfare League of America and the closing remarks were provided by Angelo McClain, CEO of NASW. Joan Levy Zlotnik, NASW Senior Consultant and child welfare workforce expert, served as moderator for this briefing.

The briefing was coordinated through the assistance of Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), the Senate Caucus on Foster Youth and the Congressional Social Work Caucus

Videos of briefing below:

 

Opening (9 minutes )

  • Joan Levy Zlotnik, NASW, Introduction
  • Christine James-Brown, CWLA, Opening remarks (begins at 04:06)

 

Joan Levy Zlotnik, NASW, (Overview and Introduction of Speakers), (03:45 minutes)

 

Helen Cahalane, Principal Investigator, Child Welfare Education and Research Programs, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work, Panelist # 1 (14:40 minutes )

 

Jenny Wood, Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Panelists #2(08:45 minutes )

 

Barry Chaffkin, Fostering Change for Children, Panelist # 3 (12:39 minutes )

 

Brandi Stocksdale, Baltimore City Department of Social Services, Panelist # 4 (Video 1 (02:10 minutes);
Video 2 (08:13 minutes)

 

Angelo McClain, National Association of Social Workers (NASW), Closing remarks (13:27 minutes )

 

Resources:

More information about NASW’s efforts to improve the child welfare workforce can be found at: http://www.socialworkblog.org/advocacy/2016/02/president-obamas-budget-offers-opportunities-for-social-workers-in-child-welfare-behaviorial-health-early-childhood-home-visiting/

NASW Issue Brief: Strengthen Child Welfare Service Delivery to Enhance Child and Family Well-Being

Educating Social Workers for Child Welfare Practice: The Status of Using Title IV-E

Funding to Support BSW & MSW Education

NASW Standards for Social Work Practice in Child Welfare

CWLA’s Hot Topic: Strengthen and Increase the Child Welfare Workforce

CWLA’s Recommended Caseload Standards

Why the Workforce Matters (Infographic)National Child Welfare Workforce Institute

 

Additional NASW child welfare related resources can be found at:

http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/children/default.asp

2 comments

  1. Is it right for a convicted felon to try and help children even if they have a degree in social work?

    • Initially I would have said, no, however, knowing that there are many different circumstances that could have been instrumental in getting a felony charge. I believe it would be better to have specific guidelines to adhere to. First , what is the nature of the felony offense, eg: if drugs ( use or dealing ) , is that person clean or stopped dealing and for how long, has the individual utilize a community support group to maintain abstinence, is it the only felony charge, I don’t believe any repeat felony offender should work with children in any capacity. If the felony is for any action/assault towards another individual or a child , I would say definately no. If the felony is for any offense against nature/animals or deviant sexual behavior , I would say definately no. Other factors I would seriously consider is the individuals level of genuine remorse. How has that individual attempted to make restitution besides incarceration , and finally what is the individuals genuine motivation in wanting to work with children. I would also want to know the individuals familial history and the quality of the individuals relationships with family, friends, co-workers and people they interact with.

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