Tag Archives: health and social work

From the Journals: Self-Care Insights from COVID-19

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[Note: Below is an excerpt from an article in the most recent issue of the journal Health & Social Work, co-published by NASW and Oxford University Press. The article was written by Christine M. Rine, PhD, associate professor, Department of Social Work, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. This article is free to be read on the Oxford University Press website.] *** ... Read More »

COVID-19 Impacts on Social Work and Nursing Now and into the Future: National Administration Plans

[Note: Below is an excerpt from an article in the most recent issue of the journal Health & Social Work, co-published by NASW and Oxford University Press. The article was written by Ethan J. Evans, PhD, MSW, assistant professor; Nassrine Noureddine, EdD, MSN, associate professor; Susanna R. Curry, PhD, MSW, assistant professor; and Kisun Nam, PhD, MSSW, associate professor, Division ... Read More »

Social Workers and the National Strategy for the COVID-19 Response and Pandemic Preparedness

[Note: Below is an excerpt from an article in the most recent issue of the journal Health & Social Work, co-published by NASW and Oxford University Press. The article was written by Ethan J. Evans, PhD, MSW, assistant professor, Division of Social Work, California State University, Sacramento. This article is free to be read on the Oxford University Press website.] ... Read More »

The Application of a Self-Labeling Approach among Military-Connected Adolescents in a Public School Setting

The contextual factors and individual responses to the labeling of military-connected adolescents as “being in a military family” is an understudied yet important phenomenon. Minimal research construes the experience of being in a military family as a label applied to military-connected populations by people in society. However, social environmental factors associated with school setting among military-connected adolescents being in a ... Read More »

Latinx Use of Traditional Health Care: The Social Network Effect

Studies on access to health care among Latinx communities have overlooked (a) the use of traditional healers and (b) the role of social networks in seeking traditional healers. A recent issue of the journal Health & Social Work, published by NASW Press, includes an article which describes a study of this issue. Framed within the network-episode model, the study aimed ... Read More »

Ethical Issues in Integrated Health Care: Implications for Social Workers

Integrated health care has come of age. What began modestly in the 1930s has evolved into a mature model of health care that is quickly becoming the standard of care. Social workers are now employed in a wide range of comprehensive integrated health care organizations. In these contexts, social workers are encountering complex, sometimes unprecedented, ethical challenges. In a recent ... Read More »

Lifetime Abuse and Quality of Life among Older People

Abuse has immediate effects on health and, in some cases, is fatal. It has been established that exposure to abuse results in physical, mental, and behavioral health consequences. Maltreatment is a common and significant burden on the health care system that can produce residual effects, both short and long term. In fact, the negative health consequences can persist long after the ... Read More »

Involved in the business of death: the social work role in postmortem care

In the United States, around 70% of deaths take place in hospital or other institutional settings (e.g., hospice). Hospitals need to handle the unique business of postmortem care: end-of-life needs, care of the decedent’s body, permission for autopsy, release of the body to the funeral home, and questions from family that may not surface for days, weeks, months, or even ... Read More »

Talking about Sexuality and Intimacy with Women Spousal Caregivers: Perspectives of Service Providers

Sex and intimacy are an important part of a physically and psychologically healthy life. Sex and intimacy also are not limited to young and middle-aged adults; older adults also enjoy lives of sex and intimacy. But when a partner becomes chronically ill, the caregiving partner may have difficulty with sex and intimacy issues. How should social workers and other service ... Read More »