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Tag Archives: Social Work Research

Comparison of Neurocognition and Social Cognition between Schizoaffective Disorder, Mood Disorders, and Schizophrenia

Photo courtesy of Mental Health Helpline.

  The relationship between schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, and mood disorders is not well understood. Evaluating and comparing cognitive impairment in these disorders can help clarify how these disorders are related. To further our understanding of these conditions, Rong Xiao, PhD, MD, Roxanne L. Bartel, MD, and John Brekke, PhD, MSW, conducted a study to examine cognitive impairment in people with ... Read More »

Women’s Psychological Adjustment to Prison: A Review for Future Social Work Directions

With the increasing number of women in prison, understanding incarcerated women’s psychological health is a timely and necessary line of research to guide policy and practices within prisons. This understanding influences prison design, service coordination, and intervention development. Social workers working with incarcerated populations especially can benefit from further research into imprisonment’s effects on women. Knowledge of how women psychologically ... Read More »

Expectant Fathers’ Beliefs and Expectations about Fathering as They Prepare to Parent a New Infant

As the socio-cultural expectations for fatherhood have evolved in recent decades, men are now expected to (and are expecting to) participate more directly in raising their children. This rising expectation is not limited to any particular socio-economic group, but few studies have been conducted concerning the fatherhood expectations among lower-income men. What are their perceptions and expectations around parenting their ... Read More »

Resilience Protective Factors in an Older Adult Population: A Qualitative Interpretive Meta-Synthesis

Social work research is critical to discovering new insights into the needs of citizens, and to developing useful strategies for assisting and empowering people in times of stress and in their daily lives. Research is vital, but often the findings of the research are too compartmentalized to receive widespread attention and discussion. One solution is to analyzing and combining multiple ... Read More »

A Comparison of Pregnancy-Only versus Mixed-Gender Group Therapy among Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorder

Opioid drug dependency has been getting increasing attention in the press lately, and in October, President Obama made expanding access to medically-assisted opioid addiction treatment programs the cornerstone of a new $133 million dollar federal program. Clearly the need to treat people with opioid use disorder is a priority for social workers and allied service providers. Substance abuse among pregnant ... Read More »

Perceptions and outcomes following teen court involvement

Teen courts, also called youth courts and peer courts, are an increasingly common intervention used to divert youths with minor offenses from the juvenile justice system. Teen courts, as a diversion option, are generally not part of the juvenile court, but, rather, function as alternatives to formal court processing. Successful participation usually means that youths exit teen court programs without ... Read More »

Religiosity and anti-social behavior

Does religious engagement act as a deterrent for anti-social behavior in young people? If so, what are the implications for social work? A growing body of literature suggests that religious engagement may protect youths from involvement in nonviolent and violent antisocial behavior. However, despite demographic evidence suggesting that religion may be particularly important among young African American women, research on ... Read More »

Bridging the Gap between Research-Supported Interventions and Everyday Social Work Practice: A New Approach

Clinical trials are essential to making progress in developing new methods for social work to help clients. Research universities use randomized clinical trials to conduct research in the field. But there are limitations to applying the results of randomized clinical trials to actual field situations. Clinical trials rely on comparing a test group to a control group. Yet often in ... Read More »

The Impact of Homeownership on Marriage and Divorce: Evidence from Propensity Score Matching

Policymakers often express concern about family stability in their communities, and promote marriage and homeownership as two of the leading means for increasing and maintaining family stability. But how do marriage and homeownership affect one another? Does homeownership increase or decrease the likelihood of a person getting married? Does it increase or decrease the likelihood of a couple getting divorced? ... Read More »