Tag Archives: Social Work Research

The Importance of Biological Parent Co-parenting in an American Indian Stepfamily Context

A number of protective factors associated with being American Indian exist; however, research shows that American Indians tend to experience higher rates of depressive symptoms than individuals of other racial or ethnic groups. Although prior research has examined sociocultural predictors of American Indian depression, less is known about the influence of familial functioning. This is particularly true for American Indian ... Read More »

Building Knowledge to Support Human Service Organizational and Management Practice: An Agenda to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

Leaders of human service organizations (HSOs) face significant pressures from policymakers and funders to justify practices and ensure successful outcomes, an issue that has implications for social work practitioners and evidence-informed management practice. Although empirical research has advanced understanding of the factors that improve human service effectiveness and organizational improvement, considerable research-to-practice gaps exist and the use and translation of ... Read More »

Spirituality, Employment Hope, and Grit: Modeling the Relationship among Underemployed Urban African Americans

Interest in the construct of grit has increased across disciplines due to its ability to predict success in a wide variety of settings. Grit is a particularly important construct among disadvantaged populations, who typically must overcome a disproportionate number of obstacles to reach their goals. In a recent issue of the journal Social Work Research, co-published by NASW Press and ... Read More »

“Water Is Life”: Using Photovoice to Document American Indian Perspectives on Water and Health

Photovoice is a qualitative community-based participatory research method that was first developed to assist rural Chinese women in documenting their everyday health and work conditions. Since its development in the mid-1990s, researchers have used photovoice to engage underserved communities of color who have been wary of research endeavors based on previous adverse experiences. With indigenous groups, photovoice has recently been ... Read More »

Transmasculine Spectrum Parenting: Beyond a Gendered Fatherhood

Little scholarship exists on parenting in the transgender and gender nonconforming community, even though a sizable portion of the community is either currently parenting or interested in becoming a parent. This dearth of literature is particularly noticeable among those individuals assigned female at birth who identify as transmasculine. In a recent issue of the journal Social Work Research, published by ... Read More »

Estimating the Economic Cost of Childhood Poverty in the United States

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Those pursuing a reduction in poverty view it as justified from a social justice perspective. But is it also justified from a cost-benefit perspective, as well? Various studies have tried to tabulate the economic costs of poverty in the United States. One recently published study, in the NASW Press- and Oxford University Press-published journal Social Work Research, attempts to delineate ... Read More »

Comparison of Neurocognition and Social Cognition between Schizoaffective Disorder, Mood Disorders, and Schizophrenia

Photo courtesy of Mental Health Helpline.

  The relationship between schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, and mood disorders is not well understood. Evaluating and comparing cognitive impairment in these disorders can help clarify how these disorders are related. To further our understanding of these conditions, Rong Xiao, PhD, MD, Roxanne L. Bartel, MD, and John Brekke, PhD, MSW, conducted a study to examine cognitive impairment in people with ... Read More »

Women’s Psychological Adjustment to Prison: A Review for Future Social Work Directions

With the increasing number of women in prison, understanding incarcerated women’s psychological health is a timely and necessary line of research to guide policy and practices within prisons. This understanding influences prison design, service coordination, and intervention development. Social workers working with incarcerated populations especially can benefit from further research into imprisonment’s effects on women. Knowledge of how women psychologically ... Read More »

Expectant Fathers’ Beliefs and Expectations about Fathering as They Prepare to Parent a New Infant

As the socio-cultural expectations for fatherhood have evolved in recent decades, men are now expected to (and are expecting to) participate more directly in raising their children. This rising expectation is not limited to any particular socio-economic group, but few studies have been conducted concerning the fatherhood expectations among lower-income men. What are their perceptions and expectations around parenting their ... Read More »

Resilience Protective Factors in an Older Adult Population: A Qualitative Interpretive Meta-Synthesis

Social work research is critical to discovering new insights into the needs of citizens, and to developing useful strategies for assisting and empowering people in times of stress and in their daily lives. Research is vital, but often the findings of the research are too compartmentalized to receive widespread attention and discussion. One solution is to analyzing and combining multiple ... Read More »